How To Get Approved For A High Credit Card Limit

Updated: 03/19/18

Are you from the people that apply for a credit card and always just get approved for a silly $2,000 – $2,500 credit limit? That will not take you far. You want to be able to swipe like a king, especially when you want to apply for a 0% APR Credit Card and want to get approved for a high credit limit and be able to transfer all your credit card debt to the new card and lower your interest payments.

Although credit card issuers look at many factors when they determine a credit limit, (for example your credit score and income being the biggest factors) here I will share some tricks on how to play your cards right to increase your chances of getting approved for a higher credit limit.

Increase Your Current Credit Lines

Card issuers, before approving you for a high credit line, will look how much of a credit line other banks are giving you (no one wants to be the first one to give high limits.) Therefore, before applying for a new card it is recommended to try first to raise the credit lines of your older credit cards. This can often be done without even making a new credit pull (find a list here). Please note that once your credit limit is raised, you will need to wait first for the credit card issuer to report the higher limit to the credit bureau and then you can apply for the new card. The information is usually updated on the date that your statement closes, but you can double check on Credit Karma for free and see if your credit file was actually updated.

Also, if you have two or more credit cards from the same card issuer, then you may want to try to ask that the bank to combine the credit lines so that you will have one card with a higher credit limit instead of two or three cards with lower credit limits.

Choose The Right Bank

There are banks that are known to be easier and more likely to approve applicants for a high credit limit. Chase, American Express, and Capital One, are all known to approve applicants for a high credit limit. (Barclay and Citi also sometimes approve you with a generous amount).  My personal experience was always best with Chase.

It is also recommended to choose a bank that you already have open credit card accounts there for a couple of years with a perfect payment history. These banks are more likely to approve you for a higher credit limits. For this reason, I always recommend clients that are starting to build their credit to apply for credit cards by a few of the big credit card issuers instead of getting two, three credit cards from the same issuer. This helps them spread out their basket and will later help them at having a better chance of getting approved for better credit cards from all those issuers.

Choose the Right Card

Once you choose a good bank, you will need to choose the right credit card. Travel credit cards or credit cards that have a high annual fee usually will approve you for a higher credit limit than a cash back or free or low annual fee cards.

There is also a cut off line on every card from which and until which amount the credit line can possibly go. You can try to research the cut off line on each card by searching the data points found on Credit Boards. There people report their credit lines on what they got approved for and based on that you can see if anyone was ever approved for the credit line you’re looking to get approved for.

Beg and Beg

Yes that is what the pros do. They call the banks as many times at it takes. They beg and beg until they manage to find somewhere, somehow a rep that is willing to help and increase there clients credit line. You do the same; do not give up after your first denial, try again and again. Explain the bank why you need the high credit line. Make sure to point out to the bank for how long you have already been a costumer. Try and try until you succeed!

Follow these tips and then please report here in the comments what worked for you, since it will be a help for the entire HMBC community.

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